Saturday, April 23, 2011

Yesterday's Chemical Spraying Makes for a Colorful Sunset

Panama City Beach, Florida April 22, 2011

Ospray Nest









7 comments:

  1. Yes, I am no longer photographing or video'ing chemtrail pictures... Doing so, made me very ill for many years. (Morgellons, etc.) Am now focusing on my Lord and Savior,Jesus Christ, and am in the best of health - finally! Thank you, Lord!

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  2. Praise Jesus for your wonderful testimony, Dee!

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  3. I am surprised nobody has commented on this site yet? This is your everyday normal aircraft "contrails" not geoengineered chemical trails... I have 20 years of aviation experience and have never heard of this term. 11 years of military flying and these aircraft pictured are commercial aircraft, trust me. Boeing 757 aircraft to be exact. The trails you see are created from the super hot engine exhaust air coming in contact with super cooled ambient air. This creates condensation (clouds) or trails of micro water particles. These have been around since the invention of jet propultion in the late 1940's. Without any evidence how could one (assume) these typical contrails are created from chemicals anyhow? Interesting concept, however, completely wrong most likely.

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  4. Gregory, are you sure? If these were normal contrails made from water vapor, they would disappear in a few minutes at the most. These streaks not only persist, but they spread and grow with time. Google, "What in the world are they spraying" or check it out via the link on the right.

    Thanks for your comments.
    Cathy

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  5. Hi Cathy. Thank you for your comments. I have done some research since first discovering your site. Seems this chemtrail topic is more popular than I first thought. I did see evidence of military chemtrail operations in Vietnam. Although the pictures and video presented in this forum and others online don't convince me yet of anything out of the ordinary. You seem intelligent and friendly enough so in reply to your question about long persisting "contrails" I offer my observation.

    Contrails are created by airplanes flying at high altitudes, where the air is below –38 degrees Fahrenheit. Exhaust from airplane engines contains water vapor (as you know) as well as other gases and particles of soot and metal. When the exhaust is expelled and mixes with the cold air, the water vapor condenses into droplets, which instantly freeze into tiny ice crystals. What you see from the ground is a dense white stream of ice crystals behind an airplane.

    Sometimes an airplane leaves no contrail at all, or an extremely short one—an indication that the air at cruise altitude is probably dry. There must be enough water molecules in the air to condense and freeze — in other words, the relative humidity must be 100 percent or greater. In dry air, any ice crystals that form would immediately evaporate.

    Even if the air is moist enough, it might not be cold enough. At typical contrail-friendly altitudes, between about 28,000 and 40,000 feet, temperatures run from about –35 to –75 degrees. If the airplane leaves a long trail, you can assume that the air is not only cold but humid, allowing the ice crystals to persist. If the contrail stops, then starts up again, creating a broken line, chances are the airplane flew through a dry patch. This would not be solid evidence of pulse-jet engine operation.

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  6. Also, as far as the "spreading" over time issue. Could it not be possible for such a contrail that persists for hours to be essentially "Blown" or slowly deteriated spanning over a larger area. This is what I have personally observed while flying. Keep in mind that the jetstream can produce winds aloft in excess of 100mph. I am not disputing that chemical additives could not be in these contrails. I am simply advising I don't see any evidence from the above photographs. If chemical particles where embedded in the contrails, I don't believe they would affect the length of time the chemicals would remain in the environment. That is all. You have inspired me to further investigate this phenomenom. I will certainly stay tuned to this blog to see what others contribute. Thank you!

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  7. And thank you, Gregory. I look forward to your feedback on the video.

    cheerios!
    Cathy

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